E-Line Flux Remover & Maintenance Cleaner

Sku Number Name Size Units
Per Case
Price
Per Case
Case
Qty
 
1621-G E-LINE Cleaner - 1 gal 1 gal (3.8L) 1 $54.29
1621-5G E-LINE Cleaner - 5 gal 5 gal (19L) 1 $233.41
1621-54G E-LINE Cleaner - 54 gal 54 gal (205L) 1 Call for pricing
Packaging Order minimum case quantity only. Extra shipping fees may apply.
Order from an authorized distributor
Hydrocarbon based defluxer formulated to be powerful, yet very economical. Eliminates brushing and scrubbing, saving time and materials.

Features & Benefits

  • Powerful cleaner
  • Ideal for sensitive plastics
  • Safe on electronics
  • Rapid evaporation
  • Zero residue
  • Proven effective for lead-free processes
  • Non-ozone depleting

FAQ's

How do you know the safe exposure limit of a degreaser, contact cleaner, or flux remover?
The personal hazard associated with a solvent is often defined using Threshold Limit Value (TLV), which is the recommended average exposure in an 8-hour day, 40 hour work week. The lower the TLV of a particular substance, the less a worker can be exposed to without harmful effects. TLV is stated on the SDS of chemical products, in additional to recommended personal protection equipment (or PPE). The threshold limit value of a solvent is generally set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). The unit of measure is Parts Per Million (PPM).
What spigot or spout do you recommend for your metal 5-gallon and 55-gallon drums?

Metal 5-gallon containers come with a flexible pop-out spout for easy pouring. 55-gallon drums are compatible with standard 2" spouts.

How do I properly dispose of an aerosol can after it is empty?

It may be different state-by-state, so contact your state environmental agency for regional specific regulations. For a general guideline, here is the process according to EPA hazardous waste regulations 40CFR. The can has to be brought to or approach atmospheric pressure to render the can empty. Puncturing is not required, only that it “approach atmospheric pressure”, i.e. empty the can contents until it’s no longer pressurized. This insures that as much contents as is reasonably possible are out of the can. It is then considered “RCRA-empty”. At that point it can be handled as any other waste metal container, generally as scrap metal under the recycling rules. Note that the can is still considered a solid waste at this point (not necessarily hazardous waste).

Articles

Flux Remover Video How-To Guide
Today, I’m going to take you through the best practices for cleaning printed circuit boards with a flux remover. A flux remover cleans off flux left behind after the soldering process. That’s important because flux residue can cause corrosion or create what’s called “dendrites”, which are ionic part...
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Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA) Replacements for Electronic Assembly and Repair
Isopropyl alcohol, also referred to as IPA, isopropanol, and 2-propanol, may be in short supply for the coming weeks or months because of the COVID-19 (Novel Coronavirus) pandemic. This will be particularly challenging for companies using IPA for flux removal, stencil cleaning, and industrial degrea...
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The Expert’s Guide to Degreasers & Maintenance Cleaners
A degreaser is a cleaner designed to remove grease, oils, cutting fluids, corrosion inhibitors, handling soils, finger prints, and other contamination common in assembly, stamping, other types of metal fabrication, refineries, motor repair, airplane hangars, and many other applications.
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5 Best Practices for Cleaning High Reliability PCBs
Aerosol cleaning prevents the introduction of new contaminants. While there are some obvious pros of aerosol cleaning, questions remain as to whether this method of benchtop cleaning can consistently and reliably clean a circuit board. This paper examines the role that different variables play in ae...
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