Electrical Cleaning

Electrical Cleaning

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Electrical Cleaning

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A contact cleaner (also called electrical cleaner, switch cleaner, electrical contact cleaner, and specific for automotive repair, battery terminal cleaner) is a solvent cleaner designed to remove contamination from electrical contacts, the conductive surfaces of connectors, switches and other electrical and electronic components with moving surface contacts.

The goal is to quickly remove insulative contamination as quickly as possible, avoiding a lot of wiping and scrubbing if possible. Contact cleaning solvents are usually come in pressurized aerosol packaging for convenience and to provide a forceful spray that creates agitation and reaches into all the crevices of the connectors.

Techspray offers a wide variety of electrical contact cleaners in spray and bulk packaging.  Our contact cleaners remove oxidation, oil, and other contaminants from contacts, metal switches, motors, relays, generators, edge connectors, buss bars, circuit breakers, scales, and sensors.

Advantages of Techspray contact cleaners:

  • Powerful cleaners - grease and oil flow right off
  • Safer solvents - do not contain TCE, nPB or Perc
  • Safe on the most common plastics
  • Available in spray can and bulk packaging
Filters

Dielectric Breakdown

Flammability

Plastic Sensitivity(Choose One)

Environmental - Safety

G3 Contact Cleaner G3 Spray Clean
Powerful, yet economical -- eliminate brushing and scrubbing saving time and materials
E-LINE Contact Cleaner E-Line Parts Sprayed Clean
Powerful and economical electrical contact cleaner in an aerosol can. Remove oxidation, oil and other contaminants from contacts, metal switches, motors relays, generators, edge connectors, buss bars, circuit breakers, scales, and sensors.
G3 Industrial Maintenance Cleaner G3 Industrial Maintenance Cleaner
Heavy-duty, fast evaporating industrial cleaner
Tech Brush - Aluminum Handle Tech Brush - Aluminum Handle
Groundable metal handle with ultra-secure bristles
Tech Brush - Detail Tech Brush - Detail
High precision brushes for cleaning and coating
Tech Brush - Wood Handle Tech Brush - Wood Handle
Strong plywood hands with ultra-secure bristles
Duster Duster
100% nonflammable HFC-134a air duster, the safest choice for energized equipment
Economy Duster Economy Duster
Economical HFC­152a based air duster
Vortex Duster Vortex High Velocity Air Duster
High-velocity nonflammable HFC-134a air duster

FAQ's

How can you reduce chemical exposure?

Every organization using hazardous chemicals within their facility has the responsibility to equip their facility and personnel to maintain exposure levels below the TLV. Personal monitoring badges can be used to measure exposure of a specific material. Then, depending on the threshold limit and the application, exposure can be controlled with PPE like masks, face shields, respirators, and even coveralls. If they don’t reduce exposure below the recommended limit, you will need to consider a special ventilation hood or even containment booth. As you can see, as the exposure limit gets down to a certain level, the equipment required to safely use the solvent can get impractical. At that point, your best option is to consider a safer alternative.

How do you know the safe exposure limit of a degreaser, contact cleaner, or flux remover?

The personal hazard associated with a solvent is often defined using Threshold Limit Value (TLV), which is the recommended average exposure in an 8-hour day, 40 hour work week. The lower the TLV of a particular substance, the less a worker can be exposed to without harmful effects. TLV is stated on the SDS of chemical products, in additional to recommended personal protection equipment (or PPE). The threshold limit value of a solvent is generally set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). The unit of measure is Parts Per Million (PPM).

Should I worry about plastic connectors and components and rubber seals when contact cleaning?

While the contact surfaces of connectors are metal, they are often housed in plastic, and rubber gaskets to seal everything from the outside environment. If the solvent used in a contact cleaner is incompatible with the plastic, it can craze (create small cracks), embrittle, or soften the material. Rubber seals may swell, shrink or even dissolve if exposed to a harsh solvent. Rigid plastics like ABS, polycarbonate (trade name Lexan), and acrylic materials like Plexiglass can be very sensitive to harsh solvents like toluene, xylene, and acetone. Alcohol and hydrocarbon based solvents tend to be better on sensitive plastics. Rubber, silicone or other seals or gaskets made of elastomeric (soft) materials can have a tendency to swell or shrink with exposure to harsh solvents. After the solvent flashes off, they may spring back to their original dimensions, or be permanently changed, impacting the effectiveness of the seal. Polyester or Teflon based gasketing materials are less prone to this type of damage from harsh solvents. A new contact cleaner should always be tested before use on any questionable applications, using any live (and expensive) equipment.

Articles

Safe & Effective Electrical Maintenance with Aerosol Contact Cleaners
A contact cleaner is a solvent cleaner designed to remove contamination from electrical contacts, the conductive surfaces of connectors, switches and other electrical and electronic components with moving surface contacts. A contact cleaner’s job is to quickly remove insulative contamination ...
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