Ultrasonic Cleaning

Ultrasonic Cleaning

Versatile Selection of Ultrasonic Cleaner Solutions

Techspray offers a variety of solvent and water-based ultrasonic cleaners. An efficient ultrasonic cleaner is designed to work in a variety of applications such as electronics cleaning, industrial cleaning, machinery and much more.

  • Techspray Renew - Water-based flux removers with zero GWP and low VOC.
  • PWR-4 – Cost effective, nonflammable, and low toxicity, so ideal replacement for n-propyl bromide (nPB) and other toxic industrial solvents.
  • G3 - a Top-selling nonflammable solvent that’s effective on the broadest array of soils.
  • Precision-V – Nonflammable replacement for AK225, and ideal for aviation, aerospace, medical and military applications.

For ultrasonic cleaning, safety is our top priority:

  • Flammability - Choosing a nonflammable cleaner is generally the safest choice. Otherwise, ventilation has to be explosion-proof and adequate to remove all the flammable fumes so they don't accumulate and create a significant hazard. It is also common to clean in a heated ultrasonic bath for extra solvency, which makes the use of a nonflammable cleaner all the more critical. Techspray offers three brand names of nonflammable solvents: G3, PWR-4, and Precision-V.
  • Toxicity - Techspray offers innovative solvents that are much safer than the four most common industrial solvents: TCE, nPB, Perc and Methylene Chloride and quickly clean the most difficult greases and fluxes. None of Techspray ultrasonic cleaners contain these highly toxic solvents, and PWR-4 is specifically engineered as a replacement.
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Ultrasonic Cleaning

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Flux Remover
Flux Remover
Degreasers
Degreasers
Electrical Contact Cleaner
Electrical Contact Cleaner
PCB Assembly Cleaners
PCB Assembly Cleaners
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Inline & Batch Cleaners
Inline & Batch Cleaners

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PWR-4 Flux Remover PWR-4 Flux Remover
Powerful, non-flammable, cost effective flux removal -- safer nPB replacement
PWR-4 Industrial Maintenance Cleaner PWR-4 Industrial Maintenance Cleaner-2
Powerful, nonflammable & cost effective cleaner that is a safer nPB replacement
G3 Universal Cleaner G3 Universal Cleaner
Nonflammable & powerful liquid cleaner
E-Line Flux Remover & Maintenance Cleaner E-Line Flux Remover & Maintainance Cleaner
Powerful & economical liquid cleaner
Precision-V Flux Remover & Maintenance Cleaner Precision-V Universal Cleaner
Nonflammable & powerful precision cleaner
Precision-V VC-1500 Flux Remover Precision-V Vapor-Degreaser Flux Remover
Powerful vapor degreaser solvent
Precision-V ME-1500 Vapor Degreaser Solvent Precision-V ME1500 Vapor-Degreaser Solvent
High precision vapor degreaser solvent
Eco-Stencil UM 	Eco-Stencil UM Understencil & Manual Cleaner
Manual & Under Stencil Cleaner - Effectively removes all types of solder paste (e.g. water­based, RMA, no­clean, lead­free) and uncured adhesive from screens, misprinted boards and equipment. Compatible with Batch ultrasonic cleaning systems
Eco-dFluxer SMT100 Eco-dFluxer SMT100
Inline & batch water-based flux remover
Eco-dFluxer SMT200 	Eco-dFluxer SMT200
Inline & batch water-based flux remover for sensitive metals
Eco-dFluxer SMT300 Eco-dFluxer SMT300
Inline & batch water-based flux remover for sensitive metals
Eco-Oven Cleaner Eco-Oven Cleaner
Cleans reflow ovens, wave soldering systems, and associated heat exchanger systems by removing all types of flux residues - Quickly clean flux residue from oven & wave fingers
Eco-Stencil RF Batch Stencil Cleaner Eco-Stencil RF Batch Stencil Cleaner
Rinse-free, nonflammable stencil cleaner for batch systems

FAQ's

How can you reduce chemical exposure?

Every organization using hazardous chemicals within their facility has the responsibility to equip their facility and personnel to maintain exposure levels below the TLV. Personal monitoring badges can be used to measure exposure of a specific material. Then, depending on the threshold limit and the application, exposure can be controlled with PPE like masks, face shields, respirators, and even coveralls. If they don’t reduce exposure below the recommended limit, you will need to consider a special ventilation hood or even containment booth. As you can see, as the exposure limit gets down to a certain level, the equipment required to safely use the solvent can get impractical. At that point, your best option is to consider a safer alternative.

How do you know the safe exposure limit of a degreaser, contact cleaner, or flux remover?

The personal hazard associated with a solvent is often defined using Threshold Limit Value (TLV), which is the recommended average exposure in an 8-hour day, 40 hour work week. The lower the TLV of a particular substance, the less a worker can be exposed to without harmful effects. TLV is stated on the SDS of chemical products, in additional to recommended personal protection equipment (or PPE). The threshold limit value of a solvent is generally set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). The unit of measure is Parts Per Million (PPM).

What Is the Best Cleaning Solvent for an Ultrasonic Process?

If the chemistry is a good solvency match to the soil, less sonic agitation will be needed. This allows you to run your cleaning process more quickly, at lower temperature, and lower amplitude, decreasing the likelihood of damaging sensitive components. The following are characteristics to look for when reviewing options: 1) Solvency – Ability of the cleaner to breakdown and dissolve the soil. For a quick evaluation of solvency, place a drop of cleaner directly on the soiled part, let it sit for a few minutes, and they blot it dry. From this simple test, you can generally tell if the chemistry is a good match to the soil. If the cleaner just sits on the surface of the soil, and doesn’t wet and start to break down the soil, move on to the next cleaner. 2) Surface tension – This impacts how well a solvent can get into tight crevices, like under low stand-off components. 3) Density – Density can have a minor impact on how quickly the sonic waves travel through the liquid, and the amount of cavitation. A higher density material requires more energy to move, so could deplete the energy, thus the cleaning power, by the time it reach the part.

How Do You Maximize Cleaning Performance with Ultrasonic Equipment?

Several adjustments can be made to increase the cleaning performance of your ultrasonic process: 1) Frequency – This is the number of waves in a second, so how “tight” the wave form is. Lower frequencies provide more aggressive cleaning, but more potential of damaging sensitive surfaces and components. High frequency sonic waves can penetrate into tighter areas. As you get over 400 kHz, in the mega-sonic range, the bubble collapse is not as violent due to smaller spacing, so cleaning is often less effective in tight areas. 2) Amplitude – This is the height of the wave, or the loudness. Greater amplitude will generally increase cleaning effectiveness, but also the potential for damage of delicate surfaces or components. 3) Temperature – Increased temperature generally improves the cleaning performance of a solvent. Higher temperature can also reduce the viscosity of the cleaner and increase the surface tension, allowing the solvent to enter tighter areas. Cleaning performance increases significantly if the temperature of the solvent is above the melting point of the soil. 4) Time – Increase the time of the cleaning cycle to compensate for lower than optimal solvency. 5) Chemistry – If the chemistry has a good solvency match to the soil, less sonic agitation will be needed. This allows you to run your cleaning process more quickly, at lower temperature, and lower amplitude, decreasing the likelihood of damaging sensitive components.

How Does Ultrasonic Equipment Work?

An ultrasonic cleaning process utilizes equipment to transmit ultrasound waves, generally between 20-40 kHZ. The transducers send those sound waves through the liquid cleaner, which acts as a transfer medium from the transducers to the parts. At very high frequency, the waves may pass over the surface of the parts, creating agitation through a process called acoustic streaming. As the frequency is reduced, it creates cavitation within the liquid. These voids quickly collapse, generating heat and shock waves, which creates agitation in the cleaning process.

What is the difference between degreaser and sanitizer?

A degreaser is intended to clean a surface, so remove contamination. A degreaser is designed specifically to remove oils, greases, and lubricants. Sanitizers are intended to kill various pathogenic agents, like bacteria and viruses. There are materials that can do both, like 70% isopropyl alcohol (per CDC guidelines for hard surface disinfecting), but don’t assume all degreasers will kill pathogens.

What chemicals are in degreasers?

The ingredients of a degreaser can vary wildly depending on the product. Generally speaking, they fall into 2 camps: 1) solvent cleaners – this includes alcohols (like isopropyl alcohol, or ethyl alcohol), hydrocarbons (like heptane and mineral spirits), ketones (like acetone and xylene), and more exotic compounds and blends. 2) water-based cleaners – these include ingredients dissolved or blended with water. Which is best for your application depends on the type of soil and various requirements like performance, evaporation rate, toxicity limits, and environmental regulations.

Is Windex a degreaser?

Windex (or other similar glass cleaners) could be considered a very light-duty degreaser. Glass cleaners can remove very light oils, like fingerprints, but will fall very short with heavier oils, greases and lubricants. Techspray offers a foaming glass cleaner (part #1625-18S) and water-based Eco-Shine (1505-QT) for light cleaning, and products like G3 Maintenance Cleaner (1630-16S), PWR-4 Maintenance Cleaner (3400-20S), and E-LINE Maintenance Cleaner (1620-10S) for more heavy-duty oils, greases and lubricants.

Are there degreasers that are more toxic than others?

N-Propyl Bromide (nPB), Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Perchloroethylene (Perc) are highly toxic chemicals commonly used in degreasers to provide cleaning performance in a nonflammable formula. There are documented court cases where workers suffered major health effects when exposed to high levels of these chemicals. Workers reported headaches, dizziness, and even loss of full body control. There are also possible links to reproductive problems and cancer. All of this has caused maintenance facilities to reconsider their solvent choices, especially with manual cleaning when exposure tends to be higher.

Should I worry about plastic packaging and components and rubber seals when degreasing?

Rigid plastics like ABS, polycarbonate (trade name Lexan), and acrylic materials like Plexiglass can be very sensitive to harsh solvents like toluene, xylene, and acetone. Alcohol and hydrocarbon based solvents tend to be better on sensitive plastics. Rubber, silicone or other seals or gaskets made of elastomeric (soft) materials can have a tendency to swell or shrink with exposure to harsh solvents. After the solvent flashes off, they may spring back to their original dimensions, or be permanently changed, impacting the effectiveness of the seal. Polyester or Teflon based gasketing materials are less prone to this type of damage from harsh solvents.

What is a degreaser?

A degreaser is a cleaner designed to remove grease, oils, cutting fluids, corrosion inhibitors, handling soils, finger prints, and other contamination common in assembly, stamping, other types of metal fabrication, refineries, motor repair, airplane hangars, and many other applications. Degreasers go by a number of different names, including precision cleaner, maintenance cleaner, and specific for automotive repair, carb cleaner, brake cleaner. The objective for a degreaser is to remove the offending soil quickly, avoiding as much wiping and scrubbing as possible. Degreasing solvents are commonly packaged as an aerosol for convenience. Aerosols have the added advantage of providing a forceful spray that creates agitation and to penetrate all the crevices of the part.

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Guide to Solvent and Water-based Ultrasonic Cleaning
When you are removing tough soils like baked-on flux residues or heavy industrial greases, you could have one of the strongest solvent cleaners in the world (like those offered by Techspray), but you would still need to implement some kind of agitation in order to achieve optimal cleanliness. You ca...
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