G3 Flux Remover

Sku Number Name Size Units
Per Case
Price
Per Case
Case
Qty
 
1631-16S G3 Flux Remover - 16oz aerosol 16 oz (454g) 12 $450.84
1631-16SB G3 Flux Remover w/brush - 16oz aerosol 16 oz (454g) 12 $462.72
Packaging Order minimum case quantity only. Extra shipping fees may apply.
Order from an authorized distributor
G3 has a powerful spray and strong solvent that blasts off residues and cleans areas under components that a brush cannot touch. Formulated to be powerful and nonflammable, yet economical. Eliminates brushing and scrubbing, saving time and materials.

Features & Benefits

  • Powerful cleaner and flux remover
  • Nonflammable
  • Rapid evaporation
  • Zero residue
  • Proven effective for lead-free processes
  • Non-ozone depleting

Specifications: Boeing D6 17487, Rev P

Call-outs: Ford TOX #167834


FAQ's

How do you know the safe exposure limit of a degreaser, contact cleaner, or flux remover?
The personal hazard associated with a solvent is often defined using Threshold Limit Value (TLV), which is the recommended average exposure in an 8-hour day, 40 hour work week. The lower the TLV of a particular substance, the less a worker can be exposed to without harmful effects. TLV is stated on the SDS of chemical products, in additional to recommended personal protection equipment (or PPE). The threshold limit value of a solvent is generally set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). The unit of measure is Parts Per Million (PPM).
How do you use an aerosol cleaner?

Hold object to be cleaned in vertical position. Pull trigger gently to control solvent flow rate. Spray from top to bottom, allowing the liquid to flush away contaminants. 

There are a number of regulations prohibiting the use of chlorinated solvents. Should I be concerned with Trans, which is used in many of your nonflammable cleaners?

No, it should not be a concern. Many of Techspray's nonflammable solvents (e.g. G3, Precision-V, PWR-4) contain 1,2-trans-dichloroethylene (Trans, CAS# 156-60-5), which has caused confusion. The regulations controlling chlorinated solvents do not generally pertain to Trans. The following are the reasons: Many are confused with “chloro” substances due to the NESHAP requirements. The big 3 chlorinated substances are Perchloroethylene (Perc), Trichloroethylene (TCE), and methylene chloride. The association of those with all chlorinated substances is not valid. NESHAP requirements only refer to restrictions of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP). Of the nearly 200 substances listed as HAP’s, Trans is not on that list. Reference the following link: https://www.epa.gov/haps/initial-list-hazardous-air-pollutants-modifications. Trans has the same exposure limit (per ACGIH) time-weighted average (TWA) as 2-propanol (IPA) -- 200 ppm. In contrast, n-Propyl Bromide (nPB) is commonly used in vapor degreasers, with TWA established by ACGIH of 10 ppm. It has been proposed to be reduced to 0.1 ppm. nPB is also listed on various carcinogen lists, notably Prop 65.

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