Precision-V Aviation Maintenance Cleaner

Sku Number Name Size Units
Per Case
Price
Per Case
Case
Qty
 
2870-19S Precision-V Aviation 19 oz. (539g) 12 $555.00
Packaging Order minimum case quantity only. Extra shipping fees may apply.
Order from an authorized distributor
Removes dirt, oil, carbon, and oxide residues from airframe, power plant and flight control systems. Plastic safe, nonflammable cleaner formulated for cleaning painted aviation components and assemblies, and minimizing repair downtime.  This precision cleaner is fast drying and has good solvency for oil, handling soils, dirt, and light residues.

Precision-V Aviation Maintenance Cleaners has environmental advantages, with zero VOC (per EPA) and low global warming potential (GWP).

Specifications: NASA/TP-2015-218207, SAE ARP1176
 

Features & Benefits

  • Ideal for aircraft surfaces exposed to hydraulic fluids and contaminants
  • Nonflammable
  • Safe on most commercial resins, plastics, urethanes, and synthetic gaskets
  • Frost-free
  • Rapid evaporation
  • Zero residue
  • Low toxicity - does not contain n-propyl bromide
  • Meets EU F-gas requirements
  • VOC-free (per EPA) - low GWP
  • Dielectric withstand voltage of 41K
  • Extension tube included for pin-point accuracy

Applications

FAQ's

How do you use an aerosol cleaner?

Hold object to be cleaned in vertical position. Pull trigger gently to control solvent flow rate. Scrub with brush from top to bottom, allowing the liquid to flush away contaminants. 

There are a number of regulations prohibiting the use of chlorinated solvents. Should I be concerned with Trans, which is used in many of your nonflammable cleaners?

No, it should not be a concern. Many of Techspray's nonflammable solvents (e.g. G3, Precision-V, PWR-4) contain 1,2-trans-dichloroethylene (Trans, CAS# 156-60-5), which has caused confusion. The regulations controlling chlorinated solvents do not generally pertain to Trans. The following are the reasons: Many are confused with “chloro” substances due to the NESHAP requirements. The big 3 chlorinated substances are Perchloroethylene (Perc), Trichloroethylene (TCE), and methylene chloride. The association of those with all chlorinated substances is not valid. NESHAP requirements only refer to restrictions of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP). Of the nearly 200 substances listed as HAP’s, Trans is not on that list. Reference the following link: https://www.epa.gov/haps/initial-list-hazardous-air-pollutants-modifications. Trans has the same exposure limit (per ACGIH) time-weighted average (TWA) as 2-propanol (IPA) -- 200 ppm. In contrast, n-Propyl Bromide (nPB) is commonly used in vapor degreasers, with TWA established by ACGIH of 10 ppm. It has been proposed to be reduced to 0.1 ppm. nPB is also listed on various carcinogen lists, notably Prop 65.

How do I properly dispose of an aerosol can after it is empty?

It may be different state-by-state, so contact your state environmental agency for regional specific regulations. For a general guideline, here is the process according to EPA hazardous waste regulations 40CFR. The can has to be brought to or approach atmospheric pressure to render the can empty. Puncturing is not required, only that it “approach atmospheric pressure”, i.e. empty the can contents until it’s no longer pressurized. This insures that as much contents as is reasonably possible are out of the can. It is then considered “RCRA-empty”. At that point it can be handled as any other waste metal container, generally as scrap metal under the recycling rules. Note that the can is still considered a solid waste at this point (not necessarily hazardous waste).

Are there degreasers that are more toxic than others?

N-Propyl Bromide (nPB), Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Perchloroethylene (Perc) are highly toxic chemicals commonly used in degreasers to provide cleaning performance in a nonflammable formula. There are documented court cases where workers suffered major health effects when exposed to high levels of these chemicals. Workers reported headaches, dizziness, and even loss of full body control. There are also possible links to reproductive problems and cancer. All of this has caused maintenance facilities to reconsider their solvent choices, especially with manual cleaning when exposure tends to be higher.

Should I worry about plastic packaging and components and rubber seals when degreasing?

Rigid plastics like ABS, polycarbonate (trade name Lexan), and acrylic materials like Plexiglass can be very sensitive to harsh solvents like toluene, xylene, and acetone. Alcohol and hydrocarbon based solvents tend to be better on sensitive plastics. Rubber, silicone or other seals or gaskets made of elastomeric (soft) materials can have a tendency to swell or shrink with exposure to harsh solvents. After the solvent flashes off, they may spring back to their original dimensions, or be permanently changed, impacting the effectiveness of the seal. Polyester or Teflon based gasketing materials are less prone to this type of damage from harsh solvents.

What is a degreaser?

A degreaser is a cleaner designed to remove grease, oils, cutting fluids, corrosion inhibitors, handling soils, finger prints, and other contamination common in assembly, stamping, other types of metal fabrication, refineries, motor repair, airplane hangars, and many other applications. Degreasers go by a number of different names, including precision cleaner, maintenance cleaner, and specific for automotive repair, carb cleaner, brake cleaner. The objective for a degreaser is to remove the offending soil quickly, avoiding as much wiping and scrubbing as possible. Degreasing solvents are commonly packaged as an aerosol for convenience. Aerosols have the added advantage of providing a forceful spray that creates agitation and to penetrate all the crevices of the part.

What is dielectric strength?

Dielectric strength is defined as the maximum electric field that the material can withstand under ideal conditions without breaking down. Breaking down in this sense is described as a failure of insulating properties, where the electricity breaks free of the conductors and burns a path through the weakest area of the insulating materials. And, it’s not a breakdown over time. As soon as there is enough free electricity it will immediately or, in a nanosecond, discharge through the insulating material.  If it doesn’t discharge through, it’s going to severely degrade it to the point it is of no insulating use. So you want a cleaner with high dielectric strength because you want it to clean without conducting. Remember, certain soils such as carbon are effective conductors of electricity, and both the combination of the conductivity of the soil and cleaning solution need to be taken into consideration.  You want the cleaner to act as an insulator to protect you while you are using it. It seems basic, but it should clean an energized surface, not conduct electricity back to you or to your insulating material and it should not corrupt or attack the circuit you are cleaning. When selecting a contact cleaner, look for dielectric strength in the product specifications. The higher the number the better, and you want to avoid spraying energized contacts with anything below 30 kV (30,000 volts).

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