PWR-4 Transit Equipment Degreaser

Sku Number Name Size Units
Per Case
Price
Per Case
Case
Qty
 
2863-20S PWR-4 Transit Equipment Degr - 20oz aerosol 20 oz (567g) 12 $459.36
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PWR4 Transit Equipment Degreaser is a single purpose transit degreaser, with strong removal ability of an oxidized hydraulic fluid, carbonized oils and fuels, lubricating oils and greases, and other organic residues. It is fast evaporating, quick penetrating, and ideal for cleaning heavily soiled parts.

  • Strong cleaner for removing hydraulic and lubricating fluids
  • Removes dirt, carbon, oil, and oxide residues
  • Removes petroleum-based oils and greases such as machining oils, cutting fluids, and rust inhibitors
  • Features a powerful, long-reaching spray to clean hard-to-reach parts
  • Nonflammable, fast-drying and leaves no residue
  • Does not contain n-propyl bromide
  • Does not contain trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene or methylene chloride
  • Dielectric breakdown of 28 kV per ASTM D877
  • Patent pending

Applications


FAQ's

How do you know the safe exposure limit of a degreaser, contact cleaner, or flux remover?

The personal hazard associated with a solvent is often defined using Threshold Limit Value (TLV), which is the recommended average exposure in an 8-hour day, 40 hour work week. The lower the TLV of a particular substance, the less a worker can be exposed to without harmful effects. TLV is stated on the SDS of chemical products, in additional to recommended personal protection equipment (or PPE). The threshold limit value of a solvent is generally set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). The unit of measure is Parts Per Million (PPM).

There are a number of regulations prohibiting the use of chlorinated solvents. Should I be concerned with Trans, which is used in many of your nonflammable cleaners?

No, it should not be a concern. Many of Techspray's nonflammable solvents (e.g. G3, Precision-V, PWR-4) contain 1,2-trans-dichloroethylene (Trans, CAS# 156-60-5), which has caused confusion. The regulations controlling chlorinated solvents do not generally pertain to Trans. The following are the reasons: Many are confused with “chloro” substances due to the NESHAP requirements. The big 3 chlorinated substances are Perchloroethylene (Perc), Trichloroethylene (TCE), and methylene chloride. The association of those with all chlorinated substances is not valid. NESHAP requirements only refer to restrictions of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP). Of the nearly 200 substances listed as HAP’s, Trans is not on that list. Reference the following link: https://www.epa.gov/haps/initial-list-hazardous-air-pollutants-modifications. Trans has the same exposure limit (per ACGIH) time-weighted average (TWA) as 2-propanol (IPA) -- 200 ppm. In contrast, n-Propyl Bromide (nPB) is commonly used in vapor degreasers, with TWA established by ACGIH of 10 ppm. It has been proposed to be reduced to 0.1 ppm. nPB is also listed on various carcinogen lists, notably Prop 65.

How do I properly dispose of an aerosol can after it is empty?

It may be different state-by-state, so contact your state environmental agency for regional specific regulations. For a general guideline, here is the process according to EPA hazardous waste regulations 40CFR. The can has to be brought to or approach atmospheric pressure to render the can empty. Puncturing is not required, only that it “approach atmospheric pressure”, i.e. empty the can contents until it’s no longer pressurized. This insures that as much contents as is reasonably possible are out of the can. It is then considered “RCRA-empty”. At that point it can be handled as any other waste metal container, generally as scrap metal under the recycling rules. Note that the can is still considered a solid waste at this point (not necessarily hazardous waste).

Articles

Safety Guide for Proper Handling of 1-Bromopropane (nPB) & Other Toxic Solvents
Employees involved in the production of 1-BP or those using it in commercial applications are those most likely to experience high exposure levels. Therefore, understanding how to evaluate, measure, and control workers’ exposure to this chemical is imperative to safe operations or to identify the co...
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Replacing n-Propyl Bromide (nPB): What You DON'T Know CAN Hurt You
Welcome to our webinar, our Techspray webinar is replacing n-propyl bromide (nPB), which you don't know can hurt you. We're going to be going over issues with n-propyl bromide, and how to identify and qualify replacement as efficiently as possible. You guys aren't chemical experts, at least I assume...
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EPA Considers 1-Bromopropane (n-Propyl Bromide, nPB) an “Unacceptable Risk” for Degreasing
In the report “Nontechnical Summary of the Risk Evaluation for 1-Bromopropane (n-Propyl Bromide)”, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that this solvent “presents an unreasonable risk for 16 conditions of use.” Those conditions of use include: Industrial and consumer use for ...
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The Expert’s Guide to Degreasers & Maintenance Cleaners
A degreaser is a cleaner designed to remove grease, oils, cutting fluids, corrosion inhibitors, handling soils, finger prints, and other contamination common in assembly, stamping, other types of metal fabrication, refineries, motor repair, airplane hangars, and many other applications.
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Trans: the Cleaning Workhorse
Trans-1, 2 - Dichloroethylene, commonly called “trans”, is an important solvent cleaning workhorse because it has high solvency, is reasonably priced, and can easily be formulated into nonflammable blends when combined with hydrofluorocarbon (HFC), hydrofluoroether (HFE) or Hydrofluoroolefin (HFO) s...
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